Most Everybody

looking, listening, reading, drawing, baking - trying to learn the art of looking sideways at the world

April 20, 2014 at 9:38am
4 notes
Happy Easter everyone

Happy Easter everyone

April 19, 2014 at 2:14pm
3 notes
"It’s enough for me to be sure that you and I exist at this moment" - Gabriel García Márquez

"It’s enough for me to be sure that you and I exist at this moment" - Gabriel García Márquez

April 18, 2014 at 2:50pm
39 notes
Reblogged from azspot

My son asked me one day, ‘Dad, what’s hell?’ … So, I said, ‘Well, if God is love, then hell is the absence of God’s love. And, can you imagine how great it is to be loved? Can you imagine how great it is to be loved fully? To be loved totally? To be loved, you know, beyond your ability to imagine? And imagine if you knew that was a possibility, and then that was taken from you, and you knew that you would never be loved. Well that’s hell—to be alone, and know what you’ve lost.’

— Stephen Colbert (via azspot)

(via azspot)

11:25am
0 notes

Berger’s and the English School’s crucifixions

11:21am
250 notes
Reblogged from theparisreview

Making things is so human that psychology and philosophy have gotten nowhere in trying to account for it.

— Guy Davenport (via theparisreview)

April 17, 2014 at 3:32pm
28 notes
Reblogged from bartonfinks

Trailer for The Homesman

(Source: bartonfinks, via matthewcandela)

3:29pm
0 notes
Unrelated doodles and notes

Unrelated doodles and notes

April 16, 2014 at 2:04pm
3 notes
It’s Charlie Chaplin’s birthday: ‘A day without laughter is a day wasted’

It’s Charlie Chaplin’s birthday: ‘A day without laughter is a day wasted’

April 15, 2014 at 2:19pm
89 notes
Reblogged from theparisreview
theparisreview:

“One day, in 2006, he called and asked me to come by later. It was just before dark. He was in the cabin where I hadn’t been in a long time. William Styron had died that day, he told me, and he wanted to have a drink. We sat there drinking and talking. He had known Styron since the Paris days in the early nineteen-fifties. Styron was a close friend—the friend of his life, he said. I hadn’t known that, the last part. I’d been with the two of them various times. They were easy with one another, easy enough to exchange insults. Styron was a southerner who didn’t fish, hunt birds, or play tennis, and who lived in Connecticut, far away—but there had been some strong cord. There were aspects of Peter that faced elsewhere—his spiritual life, his solitary travels, the intimate side of his past—and that you knew only by chance or from reading his books.”
On The New Yorker’s Page-Turner blog, James Salter remembers Peter Matthiessen.

theparisreview:

“One day, in 2006, he called and asked me to come by later. It was just before dark. He was in the cabin where I hadn’t been in a long time. William Styron had died that day, he told me, and he wanted to have a drink. We sat there drinking and talking. He had known Styron since the Paris days in the early nineteen-fifties. Styron was a close friend—the friend of his life, he said. I hadn’t known that, the last part. I’d been with the two of them various times. They were easy with one another, easy enough to exchange insults. Styron was a southerner who didn’t fish, hunt birds, or play tennis, and who lived in Connecticut, far away—but there had been some strong cord. There were aspects of Peter that faced elsewhere—his spiritual life, his solitary travels, the intimate side of his past—and that you knew only by chance or from reading his books.”

On The New Yorker’s Page-Turner blog, James Salter remembers Peter Matthiessen.

2:16pm
2 notes
Reblogged from doughbrothers

doughbrothers:

Starting off the Friday shift last week testing out a fun timelapse app

Timelapse bread kitchen